Post Docs

Laia Soto Bermant

Laia Soto Bermant is a 2013-2014 Postdoctoral Research Associate in Comparative Border Studies. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Oxford where she explored the links that tie Melilla to the neighboring Moroccan province of Nador. Her current work continues the same line of inquiry with an ethnographic study of a border-town located on the periphery of Melilla. Following the trajectory of a group of frontier-workers in and out of the enclave, the project asks how those who regularly move between the two territories imagine the border and the spaces it is meant to separate, and examines how the experience of border-crossing is incorporated into the wider narratives through which Berbers in the eastern Rif come to constitute themselves as a 'moral community'.

 

Megan Carney

Megan Carney is a 2013-2014 Postdoctoral Research Associate in Comparative Border Studies. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara where she examined the lived experience of food insecurity among Mexican and Central American migrant women living in southern California and state approaches to health disparities in migrant communities. She is currently working on two projects. The first project focuses on medical and food practices of the U.S. immigrant-detention system and repercussions for the mental health of detainees, specifically women and children. The other project investigates the health and social repercussions of austerity in European Union (EU) through the lens of privatized eldercare in Italy.

 

Holly Karibo

Holly Karibo is a 2013-2014 Postdoctoral Research Associate in Comparative Border Studies. She received her Ph.D. in the Collaborative Program in History and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, “Ambassadors of Pleasure: Illicit Economies in the Detroit-Windsor Borderland, 1945-1960,” examined the social and cultural history of vice along the Canada-US border during the postwar period. Holly's current project expands the scope of her dissertation research by considering how the US-Mexico border shaped public perceptions of heroin trafficking in Canada and the United States.